Alysn Midgelow-Marsden

New Zealand Textile Arts Hit the UK!

Choose a theme


Copy (Ctrl C) the code below

It's time for New Zealand textile art to shine and we'd love you to join us!

Textile art is one of the most popular and accessible art forms; engaging global audiences across age, gender, culture, physical ability and ethnicity.

New Zealand Textile artists have been given a golden international opportunity to show at the prestigious Knitting and Stitching Shows in the United Kingdom this year, alongside many international guest artists and groups.

Our artists have been selected on the basis of their individual works; to present unique concepts with exquisite execution. Collectively, they show a breadth which is representative of the highest New Zealand quality in contemporary fibre, thread, fabric and cloth.

Though there are many are textile artists in New Zealand whose work is at least on a par with the highest international standards, they are not well recognised on the international arena. By securing this touring exhibition opportunity, there is a chance to redress the balance, to draw attention to the incredible work that is created here. The artists we have selected demonstrate innovation and an exciting disruption to this global art practice.

The Knitting and Stitching Show is quite simply the definitive and best public textile show in the UK and Ireland. It travels between London, Dublin and Harrogate annually during October and November attracting many, many thousands of visitors from the UK, Europe and around the world.

The Knitting and Stitching Show organisers have agreed to give support for the exhibition to the value of $150,000. This includes the floor space, the walls, plinths, lighting, power, marketing and transport and insurance of the works between venues.

Despite the generous support offered by the show organisers, there are many other costs involved. The participating artists have all agreed to a fee which will cover many of these costs, we now are aiming to cover the transport costs of the artworks to and from the UK and if possible to create an exhibition brochure as a lasting reminder for the artists and show visitors.

We are ecstatic to have this opportunity, representing New Zealand and twenty of our best textile artists on such an important international stage.

Your help in this final stage would be so appreciated. We just need to get these artworks on the plane!!

The Project Collaborators

Alysn Midgelow-Marsden has extensive experience with textile art and exhibitions and has partnered with the Arts Council Nelson, who have developed the prestigious 'Changing Threads' annual textile showcase, to see this project to fruition. The tour will be accompanied by Alysn at each exhibition site in order to interact with the many visitors and to promote the makers as well as New Zealand textiles and the industry in general.

 

 



UPDATES

  • Dublin loved us!

    19 MONTHS AGO

    The thousands of visitors to the Knitting and Stitching Show in Dublin last week were bowled over by the NZ textile art. One visitor has been told in her supermarket that she had to get to the show specifically to see our exhibition! I also met many Kiwi's now living a long way from home who were glad to connect with something of their own.

    The Nelson post have just written an article about the exhibition too:

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/nelson-mail/lifestyle-entertainment/74004685/stitchers-a-hit-with-brits

    Next week I travel to Harrogate to set it up again for the last time. How sad that will be. Remember that to see the full story, keep an eye on:

    http://alysnsburntofferings.blogspot.co.uk/

    and

    https://www.facebook.com/AlysnMidgelowMarsdenArtTextiles/

     

    Dublin loved us!
  • Smiles all round

    21 MONTHS AGO

    Day 3 of 5 for the Alexandra Palace passed in another whirlwind of appreciation for the textiles you helped to send to the show. Best in Show was heard again, as were many other positive comments. Many visitors are taken by the characters craeted by Sherril Jennings. This photo shows just one family who I invited to choose their favourites to show you.

    Smiles all round
  • Wonderful reception in London for the exhibition

    21 MONTHS AGO

    The exhibition was set up over a long day on Tuesday with help from the great team at Upper Street Events who gave us the space and run the Knitting and Stitching Shows and we have been open to the public for 2 days (3 to go).

    The response of the public has been fabulous. Many have described it as their favourite section (of 95 other gallery spaces), as fresh, as amazing etc. etc. Many can't belieive that we have come from around the world to show our art. Also there has been interest from magazines to follow up and showcase us, which of course I will chase up.

    All in all a great start. With thanks to your generous help, we are doing what we set out to and proving that NZ punches well above it's weight in talent!

    Wonderful reception in London for the exhibition
  • Here we go ...

    21 MONTHS AGO

    After a little to and fro with the customs people, I have been reunited in London with the parcels of the textile art work sent from NZ a coupl eof weeks ago. Today was spent unpacking and with the help of the great team at the show, it is now set up and ready for the opening tomorrow morning.

    Here we go ...
  • My light

    21 MONTHS AGO

    This artwork was exhibited for the Changing Threads Contemporary Fibre Art Awards in Nelson, NZ. It comprised of four hanging layers of silk organza. Each layer was hand stitched with silhouettes representing four generations of my family.

    The work is entitled; 'My Light'.

    Light, air, breath.

    My Ancestors float

    In these layers of mist and memory.

    Holding the latest newborn

    In their ancient light.

    My Light.

    by Yoke Helwes Martens

    My light
  • Video of La

    21 MONTHS AGO

  • Katherine Bertram - THANKYOU FOR SUCH WONDERFUL SUPPORT

    21 MONTHS AGO

    Firstly - Thankyou for all those who have donated to this amazing project. It is an amazing opportunity and a special event and I am thrilled to be a part of it. I would like to share an image that I completed whilst engaged solely in my printmaking practice. I find it amazing how so much of my leaning towards textiles is evident in my artistic practice before I began to work on singular textile pieces. The image below is called, Travelling Tapestry. It comes from the Bayeux tapestry a simply wonderful history as well as stitched work. It involves linocut squares with images of jewels I acquired in India, a collograph print of a lace fragment and some hand stitched little fighters from the tapestry. I love the delicate nature of the red stitching about a subject that is so horrific. I think that today when this is done it is seen as highly contemporary and innovative. I also love how stitching was used as a valid medium for such important historical records. The composition looks at the nature of textiles and its value as a recorder of information and also the juxtaposition of the domestic craft representing a battle for power and possessions. Clearly I had stitching in the blood. Thankyou for making this exhibition possible and please continue to donate.

    Katherine Bertram - THANKYOU FOR SUCH WONDERFUL SUPPORT
  • Yee Haa !! We're on the way!

    21 MONTHS AGO

    If I could hug you all, I would!
    You generous souls from across the globe have enabled us to pack the artwork and get it flying over the oceans. I will catch up with it in London, then unpack and hang it at the first venue - The Knitting and Stitching Show at Alexandra Palace.
    We still have some time to go before the end of the campaign, and more donations are arriving. All of these will be put towards the cost of an exhibition catalogue which will be available at the exhibitions. It will include images, statements and contact details of the artists and provide a fabulous tool to keep the artists and their work in the minds of those who see the exhibition in the flesh.

    I am off to begin the design work right now.

    xxxx (virtual hugs)

    Yee Haa !! We're on the way!
  • Colleen Plank

    21 MONTHS AGO

    These girls are off to the UK and Ireland, I hope they will behave themselves..

    Colleen Plank
  • Donations

    21 MONTHS AGO

    Thanks to everyone on my personal 'hit list' who have very kindly donated to our fantastic cause, you are all amazing.

    In the spirit of widening the search, I have posted a link to our campaign & the KSS on my The Big Idea page: http://www.thebigidea.co.nz/show/object-art/163933-nineteen-thousand-words-and-counting. 

    $375 to go, we're almost there!

     

    Chrissie Cleary

     

  • Chrissie Cleary

    21 MONTHS AGO

    My play instinct, then and now

    Chrissie Cleary
  • Play instinct

    21 MONTHS AGO

    Three years ago I fell in love with freeform machine-stitch. Being in control of where the ebbing and flowing stitches made their mark initially felt quite unnerving, possibly in fear of making a 'mistake'. These days I embrace imperfection, there is no wrong or right way, it's all about spontaneity and expression. Back then, in art student mode, vibrant clashing colour was my thing, sweeping lines careering here and there, the sense of anything goes, free of form and thought, the act of exuberant play in evidence. Even though my love of intense colour has waned, the play instinct remains as strong as ever. My current work may be dark in content and hue but the process is an essentially joyous one and always will be.

    Jung's quote (image below) was pinned to my studio wall as a reminder that without the play instinct my practice would be very dull indeed.    

      

     

    Play instinct
  • "La Fileuse -The Spinner"

    21 MONTHS AGO

    It was a surreal moment when I popped my rather long but narrow exhibition piece onto the courier to head north to be placed with the other 16 exhibitors pieces to head to The Knitting & Stitching Show together. After hand embroidering on 2 pianola rolls back to back it was amazing that the 2 rolls had such a different feel to them and how they both handles differently when stiching and knitting through and onto.

    When I tell people what I am doing it is surprising who says "Wow I am going to be there at the show and will look out for your NZ stand"

    Thank you to all the donations coming through and to those that are coming. This really is a huge WOW moment for our group of Textile Artists.

    Sandra Hall

     

    "La Fileuse -The Spinner"
  • Vertical Dyeing - Clare Smith

    21 MONTHS AGO

    Over the last few years I have been looking at how and where, fabrics for clothing and quilting are manufactured.  One article said that you could predict the next season’s fashion colours by looking at rivers in China on GoogleEarth. There are amazing pictures of rivers which have turned red, blue or turquoise depending on the dyes used that day. I  started thinking about how the dye in the river might affect crops and farming so I tried to make the dye travel up the fabric as if the dye was seeping into the landscape. Unfortunately gravity prevents the dye travelling very far and eventually a friend suggested I pour the dye down from the top. If possible I dye these wallhangings in the gallery in 'real-time' by climbing on a ladder and pouring dye into cups at the top which can be rather worrying if the gallery has carpet on the floor.

    These pieces are made by cutting out a design from cotton organdy and attaching it to the back of a larger piece and stitching it down. Where there are two layers of fabric or stitch lines, the dye spreads faster. Here is a Youtube clip with a stop motion video of the dye spreading through one of the pieces which will be shown at the Knitting and Stitching Shows. 

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4mXWYBZcE8

    Vertical Dyeing - Clare Smith
  • Vertical Dyeing - Clare Smith

    21 MONTHS AGO

    Over the last few years I have been looking at how and where, fabrics for clothing and quilting are manufactured.  One article said that you could predict the next season’s fashion colours by looking at rivers in China on GoogleEarth. There are amazing pictures of rivers which have turned red, blue or turquoise depending on the dyes used that day. I  started thinking about how the dye in the river might affect crops and farming so I tried to make the dye travel up the fabric as if the dye was seeping into the landscape. Unfortunately gravity prevents the dye travelling very far and eventually a friend suggested I pour the dye down from the top. If possible I dye these wallhangings in the gallery in 'real-time' by climbing on a ladder and pouring dye into cups at the top which can be rather worrying if the gallery has carpet on the floor.

    These pieces are made by cutting out a design from cotton organdy and attaching it to the back of a larger piece and stitching it down. Where there are two layers of fabric or stitch lines, the dye spreads faster. Here is a Youtube clip with a stop motion video of the dye spreading through one of the pieces which will be shown at the Knitting and Stitching Shows. 

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4mXWYBZcE8

    Vertical Dyeing - Clare Smith
  • Vertical Dyeing - Clare Smith

    21 MONTHS AGO

    Over the last few years I have been looking at how and where, fabrics for clothing and quilting are manufactured.  One article said that you could predict the next season’s fashion colours by looking at rivers in China on GoogleEarth. There are amazing pictures of rivers which have turned red, blue or turquoise depending on the dyes used that day. I  started thinking about how the dye in the river might affect crops and farming so I tried to make the dye travel up the fabric as if the dye was seeping into the landscape. Unfortunately gravity prevents the dye travelling very far and eventually a friend suggested I pour the dye down from the top. If possible I dye these wallhangings in the gallery in 'real-time' by climbing on a ladder and pouring dye into cups at the top which can be rather worrying if the gallery has carpet on the floor.

    These pieces are made by cutting out a design from cotton organdy and attaching it to the back of a larger piece and stitching it down. Where there are two layers of fabric or stitch lines, the dye spreads faster. Here is a Youtube clip with a stop motion video of the dye spreading through one of the pieces which will be shown at the Knitting and Stitching Shows. 

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4mXWYBZcE8

    Vertical Dyeing - Clare Smith
  • Get the low down on the show!

    21 MONTHS AGO

    We have now shown you many of the artists, what about the show they are going to be at?

    If you want to have a look at any of these links you will be able to keep up to date with them all the time:

    https://www.facebook.com/knittingandstitchingshows
    https://twitter.com/twistedthread
    http://www.instagram.com/twistedthread
    http:// www.pinterest.com/twistedthreaduk

    Easy!

  • Women's handwork and political messages

    21 MONTHS AGO

    As an artist, I explore the powerful impact which results when soft, often fragile fabric, stitches and designs are juxtaposed against the messages of women’s lived day-to-day realities  

    Heartfelt: Excerpts from the publications of a washed up feminist academic.

    This artwork represents the essence of my 25 year career as a feminist academic. It merges three elements: excerpts from selected publications, the concept of 'washed-up', and sturdy, utilitarian tea towels which carry the printed excerpts. Together and individually, the elements offer glimpses into the demands, delights, dilemmas and heartache of those years.

     

    Joyce Stalker

    Hamilton, NZ Aotearoa

    Women's handwork and political messages
  • News from Yoke Martens

    21 MONTHS AGO

    'My current passion involves recycling antique lace handkerchiefs. I love the fragility of the old linen and lace combinations. Throughout the day I am a longarm quilter, and in the evenings I love to hand stitch, which helps me to unwind and reflect on my day. My work for the exhibition displays my ongoing fascination with faces and form, which I’ve translated through stitch onto the hankerchiefs.'

    News from Yoke Martens
  • Sherril Jennings

    22 MONTHS AGO

    This wee girl has a baby's bracelet as her head. The symbolism shows our growth from babyhood to adulthood with the connections remaining. The nurturing blanket with the child's teddy is it's security. 

    Sherril Jennings
  • Sheril Jennings

    22 MONTHS AGO

    My inspiration for the girls comes from a shared history common to us all. It’s a dialogue with my ancestors from one generation to another. From my Great Grandmother to my Grandmother to my Mother. She was so creative and passed on her many skills. These skills have evolved over the years from knitting as a 6 year old to more complex layering, stitching, crochet, embroidery, knitting and printing. There’s nothing cuddly about the dolls and yet they make a statement. They are contemporary as they appeal to both men and women. They are girls of the future made up of parts from our shared collective past.

    Sheril Jennings
  • Ronnie Martin's words

    22 MONTHS AGO

    I am fascinated by marks-both stitched and drawn.
    Currently I am exploring the stitched mark as a means of creative expression. The two pieces for the exhibition use my painted fabrics with both stamps and stencils as a base for hand and machine stitching. I enjoy the blending of abstracted images with work which creates an intriguing narrative for the viewer.
    The image is a detail of my piece
    ‘Colour of my Land’

    Ronnie Martin's words
  • The bunny wabbit fashion designer is Chrissie Cleary

    22 MONTHS AGO

  • In my spare time

    22 MONTHS AGO

    When I'm not delving into what makes us humans tick (heavy stuff), I enjoy making clothes for Hans, a friends taxidermy bunny wabbit, most recently a birthday cloak and crown in vivid orange satin. He's a handsome boy. This is a playful antidote to the monochromatic colour scheme and content of my current work and more importantly, lots of fun. The play aspect of being an artist should never be underestimated, it definitely keeps me sane (and smiling.) 

    Ps. A HUGE thank you to a certain someone for their extremely generous donation to our fund. You are most kind.    

    In my spare time
  • More from Leah ...

    22 MONTHS AGO

    A combination of my favorite technique – crochet with my favorite material – NZ flax

  • Leah Wald says ...

    22 MONTHS AGO

    Moving around is the only constant in my life. I can feel at home anywhere but belong nowhere, I’ve learnt to live in-between cultures and languages. My art practice is influenced by theses different perspectives; I fuse materials, techniques and traditions to explore the interconnected complexities of identity and place.

    Leah Wald says ...
  • The Special Ladies of the Kowhai Group in Warkworth

    22 MONTHS AGO

    After enjoying a day paying with papers, hot wax, gilding and stitching with a fabulously enthusiastic group in Warkworth, they blew me away by presenting me with their collection to help our project acheive it's aims.

    Here they are, look at those smiles!

    Thank you all

    The Special Ladies of the Kowhai Group in Warkworth
  • Katherine Bertram

    22 MONTHS AGO

    A new direction - using my drawings to become sculpture. I find this process challenging and rewarding. At the moment I have been working with birds - but I have plans!

    Katherine Bertram
  • Katherine Bertram

    22 MONTHS AGO

    My subject matter is locally domestic. It reflects the Kiwi obsession with its own “Kiwiana” and its affection for the small and suburban. Coming from a printmaking background the dark textural lines of stitched thread are not unlike the subtle raised impressions of the intaglio ink onto dampened paper. The bitten line is a mechanical process as is the machine drawn line and yet both rely on the delicate hand of the artist. It is an imperfect art. I love the way in which a freehand drawn image has wobbly lines, lines that go over edges and hurried movements that dart back and forth. This aspect grounds the work and in my case the evidence of the human hand reinforces the humanity and sentimentality of my subjects. To draw I complete drawings on paper and then with these as a guide I mark out outlines and then stitch. The video included is a quick sample of how the process works. I confess that with a detailed piece I tend to work a little slower and with more care. My move to sewing occurred with the birth of my 3rd child when the printing press became a luxury its size and chemical processes relegated to the basement. The compact sewing machine capable of creating useful items took its place – and then I discovered that it could do so much more than make a swirly skirt.

    Watch how I work

    http://youtu.be/EM2xgGf_jEY

    Katherine Bertram
  • Third, the Meaning

    22 MONTHS AGO

    Third, the Meaning

    Rather than making lace from muka which has been completely extracted from the harakeke leaves I keep part of the leaf whole. This allows the origin of the muka fibres to be a dominant part of my work, acknowledging the Māori meanings held within harakeke. In my ‘lace leaves’ the tip and edges remain whole.
    (For ‘Changing Perspectives’ 104 x 24 x 6 cm see second photo below)

    Joyce Fleming
    ‘Kereru’ (NZ wood pigeon) 6 x 15 x 11 cm

    Third, the Meaning
  • Manu (bird) series

    22 MONTHS AGO

    In my ‘birds’ the leaf is represented by the strips which form the woven structure.

    Fleeting glimpses of plumage and snatches of song of New Zealand native birds, many of which are threatened species, inspire the colours and patterns and reflect the intricate weave of relationships in an ecosystem.

    Joyce Fleming
    ‘Kereru’ (NZ wood pigeon) 6 x 15 x 11 cm

    Manu (bird) series
  • Support from prestigious gallery for our campaign

    22 MONTHS AGO

    Objectspace, Ponsonby, Auckland are behind us all the way to the UK. Check out their FB page to see what else they are doing. I visited their current, and engrossing exhibition 'Strands' earlier this week. It was well worth taking a long, quiet peruse and reading about the artist and their works, even braving the spring rain!

    Follow this link:

    https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1035143196510026&id=210656108958743&refid=17&_ft_=top_level_post_id.1035143196510026

  • Thread drawings

    22 MONTHS AGO

    In my current body of work I am looking at the everyday objects which form part of our environment – those things we look at but never see. Each of these mundane objects has a story, much like the first or last line in a book - a story is about to unfold, or has just ended. What happens next is up to the viewer.

     

    Michelle de Silva

    ('free', hand stiched thread on canvas, 2015)

    Thread drawings
  • Second, the Method – Bobbin lace and Māori weaving techniques together

    22 MONTHS AGO

    I developed ‘lace-leaves’ to combine bobbin lace with Māori methods of extracting muka (harakeke fibre) while acknowledging the cultural significance of the plant. My intention is to create work that draws from both cultures but allows each to remain evident in the completed piece. Each lace-leaf is made from half a leaf of harakeke. The tip and two sides are left intact. The muka extracted from the central strip remains attached to the leaf tip and is wound onto bobbins to make European bobbin lace.

    Joyce Fleming

    Second, the Method – Bobbin lace and Māori weaving techniques together
  • From ‘lace-leaves’ to ‘birds’

    22 MONTHS AGO

    From the ‘lace-leaf’ idea I have recently developed a Manu (bird) series. For these the leaf tips with attached muka are divided into narrow strips and woven using raranga techniques while the muka is woven into bobbin lace. Next, the Meaning.

    Joyce Fleming

    From ‘lace-leaves’ to ‘birds’
  • Jo Kinross

    22 MONTHS AGO

    Banksia Rose stalks and bark - who would think you would get purple!

    Jo Kinross
  • Revealing Nature's Secret Colours

    22 MONTHS AGO

    My work as a fibre artist involves a number of core elements - sustainability, discovery and working closely with nature.  I love using simple processes such as contact printing with various plant parts onto natural fabrics or yarns, working with natural resists to create amazing patterns and making natural dyes from plants gathered from my garden or surrounding environment.

    I think the thing I like most about this way of working is never really knowing what the end result will be - there is a certain liberation or freedom in not being in control of the end result - you might have an idea in your head about what you are trying to achieve but the reality is often something else.  If its not quite "right" then the challenge is to explore how to make it more interesting, pleasing or harmonious - overdyeing and stitching are two of my favourite ways to do this.

     

     

    Revealing Nature's Secret Colours
  • Go on, watch this ...

    22 MONTHS AGO

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZGeZ4KVB68

  • More about Colleen

    22 MONTHS AGO

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZGeZ4KVB68

  • A few words from Colleen

    22 MONTHS AGO

    My textile works are usually a reflection of what I am exposed to at the current time; a reading, a place, a memory or just a conversation can start up my engine to create a textile piece.
    Conceptualizing, transforming and manipulating those ideas and materials until I capture what form the work will take is what keeps me on edge until finally they make their way into a gallery or a specific space.
    Being the daughter of a Dubliner makes me feel more connected to this show and with having my mother in mind when making these works it is almost like sending her home.

    A few words from Colleen
  • First, the Material – Harakeke, my Inspiration

    22 MONTHS AGO

    The chattering of huge leaves in a breeze, the scent of the cut strips, the feel of the fibres. This is harakeke, my material and inspiration. Named New Zealand Flax (Phormium tenax) by Europeans, Māori have used the plant for centuries to provide for their every need and it is deeply rooted in their culture. I love working with harakeke. Finding a way to sensitively combine my European fibre skills with such a culturally significant plant was my challenge. Second, the Method – coming shortly!

    Joyce Fleming

    First, the Material – Harakeke, my Inspiration
  • Forgotten Treasures

    22 MONTHS AGO

    I love working with forgotten treasures. They bring the past to the fore and we can relive times gone by in a new and revamped way. I grew up with a Pianola Piano and about 7-8 years ago started collecting pianola rolls to one day embroider on. Last month I embroidered, knitted, wove and sewed old findings and buttons onto a roll....all 9.5 metres x 35cm. My idea of pure fun taking an old roll that could not be played anymore due to damage and turning it into an art form.     As my work is often done in series, this will be a work of progression and extending myself to add further detail and delivery to each roll I remodel into the visual textile art it can and will be.


    Sandra Hall

    Forgotten Treasures
  • The Human Condition

    22 MONTHS AGO

    Perhaps the strongest element of my work is an overwhelming desire to capture what it means to be human. Complex thought processes represented by imperfectly-stitched line, remembrance in the form of obsessively worked surface, layers that conceal and reveal. And the physical sensation of touch, fingers running over a beautifully crafted work, experiencing a tactile conversation with its maker. This is what draws me to stitch. 

    Chrissie Cleary 

    The Human Condition
  • Freeform

    22 MONTHS AGO

    Freeform machine stitch lies at the heart of my current practice. Flowing from the needle as ink from a pen, the stitches rapidly form undulating lines and shapes. Backwards and forwards, here there and everywhere, where it makes its mark is entirely up to me. 

    Almost always there is no big plan, I simply go where the mood takes me. Often wild and wonderful, other times slow and steady, the random, unpredictable nature of freeform stitch inspires me immensely. Perfection is impossible to achieve and I really like that.  

    My greatest passion is combining freeform stitch with unexpected, intriguing material. The process of (re) forming the everyday into something extraordinary is highly addictive. I am never ever bored when freeform stitching. 

    Chrissie Cleary

    Freeform
  • Alysn Midgelow-Marsden: A brief intro …

    22 MONTHS AGO

    The Knitting and Stitching Show in the UK has to be one of the busiest, most tiring and most exhilarating, fun events of my annual calendar. It is such a great way to meet enormous numbers of people who truly appreciate the work I make. They are not only interested in the technicalities and materials, but the concepts and the development of the work. It is a chance to network with influential characters in the textile world, especially publishers, gallery owners and workshop convenors from many countries.
    So, I am really looking forward to taking the work of this selection of committed textile artists to the Knitting and Stitching Show.
    It will be my job and pleasure to display the work at each venue then to discuss it with as many visitors as possible.
    About me: My work is varied in material and technique, though the one thing it rarely uses is a straightforward cloth! More often I am creating the fabrics from scratch, altering, distorting and distressing and burning. Somehow my science background sneaks in whether that is by trying to understand the nature of the ‘materials’ I wish to use, or the surfaces and treatments I can apply to them.
    My conceptual interests are usually about personal themes and emotions and the method of expressing these in a visual form. Maybe more about that later in another post.

    Alysn Midgelow-Marsden: A brief intro …
  • My Happy Place

    22 MONTHS AGO

    My studio is my happy place and from that wonderful space comes all my creations. These are some of my favourite things. 

    Sherril Jennings

    My Happy Place
  • An overview

    22 MONTHS AGO

    It’s all about our passion, our unremitting need to express ourselves through textiles and stitch.
    I know from personal experience just how much of a ‘boost’ (!) involvement in this exhibition will give to the profile and kudos of the textile artists who are sending work.
    If you have been to a big international textile show before, then you will understand the buzz around the exhibitions, the hoards of hugely inquisitive viewers every day! They are great places for networking with thousands of like minded people as well as the gallery owners, magazine and book publishers prowling around on the look out for novel stories or new authors.
    My hope with taking this selection of work to the Knitting and Stitching Show is that as many as possible of the artists will have a chance to extend their reach into an international arena.
    The image for today is one taken during my solo exhibtion at the show in 2006.
    I offer a grateful thanks to the donors who have already shown that they believe in the project.

    Cheers,

    Alysn

    An overview